[Clinical Picture] Dermacentor tick attached to tympanic membrane

In June, 2008, a 47-year-old woman presented to us with a 1-day history of crackling sensations in her left ear. On otoscopic examination, a tick was seen on the left tympanic membrane (). An otorhinolaryngologist removed the tick with endoscopic-guided forceps. There was no bleeding, perforation, hearing loss, or other sequelae. The crackling sensations resolved immediately. The tick was identified as Dermacentor variabilis, commonly known as the American dog tick. Our patient lived in a rural area of Minnesota, USA where the tick-borne diseases lyme and human anaplasmosis are endemic. (Source: LANCET)

In June, 2008, a 47-year-old woman presented to us with a 1-day history of crackling sensations in her left ear. On otoscopic examination, a tick was seen on the left tympanic membrane (). An otorhinolaryngologist removed the tick with endoscopic-guided forceps. There was no bleeding, perforation, hearing loss, or other sequelae. The crackling sensations resolved immediately. The tick was identified as Dermacentor variabilis, commonly known as the American

dog tick. Our patient lived in a rural area of Minnesota, USA where the tick-borne diseases lyme and human anaplasmosis are endemic. (Source: LANCET)

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